Crossed My Mind 299

PETITION FOR GINA TORRES TO PLAY WONDER WOMAN

geejayeff:

ctron164:

amgkatt:

BECAUSE
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AND ALSOimage
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JUST
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LET ME JUST SAY

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IF YOU DON’T ALREADY THINK THIS WOMAN IS AN AMAZONIAN PRINCESS
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YOU ARE DOING IT TOO WRONG FOR WORDS.

Yaaaasss !!!

Gina IS Wonder Woman. Hollywood merely has to decide whether they can risk capturing the awesomeness on film and thereby ruin the part for their err…”typical” casting choices for all time.

They cast someone already. However Gina would be super cool as Wonder Woman.


pearlcrystalgem:

travellingcompanionstephrogers:

chafing-nipples:

modmad:

nooby-banana:

becauseimdavefuckinstrider:

jim fucking carrey

jim fucking carrey



I love Jim Carrey. I once met him in a 7/11, and I was getting a soda, I turned and saw it was him, and he saw I was going for a Doctor Pepper, so he said “Oh did you want one of these”, to which I stuttered out a yes and he grabbed all of them and said “too bad” and brought them up to the front. Then he bought his stuff and left the sodas there, and left. Almost immediately after, he ran back in and began putting the sodas back and paid for mine.

This is what happens when Candians are let lose and try to prank people

I

I always hope these stories are true, even if i take them with a grain of salt.

pearlcrystalgem:

travellingcompanionstephrogers:

chafing-nipples:

modmad:

nooby-banana:

becauseimdavefuckinstrider:

jim fucking carrey

jim fucking carrey

image

I love Jim Carrey. I once met him in a 7/11, and I was getting a soda, I turned and saw it was him, and he saw I was going for a Doctor Pepper, so he said “Oh did you want one of these”, to which I stuttered out a yes and he grabbed all of them and said “too bad” and brought them up to the front. Then he bought his stuff and left the sodas there, and left. Almost immediately after, he ran back in and began putting the sodas back and paid for mine.

This is what happens when Candians are let lose and try to prank people

I

I always hope these stories are true, even if i take them with a grain of salt.


rachelthefish:

dreamwurks:

ineffablye:

Like everyone always talks about how amazing Rise of the Guardians’ animation was but I think we need to all take a step back and look at the work of art that TinTin was like

image

just

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look

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at

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this

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animation

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like

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wow

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WOW

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look at this detail i cant even

When I first saw a trailer on TV I thought it was live action until I saw it again and I was like “wait is it live action”

You thought it was live action because it partially is Tin tin was Motion Capture which means it was real actors whose movements were tracked and then placed on the characters. And saying “look at the detail” after showing still images, which I see all the time means you’re not admiring the animation which is the movement and acting of the characters and objects you’re admiring (in this case) the work of the 3D modelers, texture artists, lighting artists and many other artists who put their work into animated films. You can say “Wow look at this animated movie it’s amazing!” but saying “Look at this animation it’s amazing!” you are completely disregarding the work of the countless non-animators that work on these films. Especially when it’s not actually the animation you’re admiring. I swear if I see one more post about the pockmarks on Jack’s skin going “Gee wow the animation in this movie is amazing!” I’m going to kick someone. Just say “Wow the texture on his face is amazing!” quit throwing animation around like it refers to every aspect of an animated film.

Rachel thank you for saying exactly what I was thinking. For the record I’m not a huge fan of the Tin Tin movie, it sure looks nice but it’s kinda meh in the story department. 


tf2crazy:

advils:

plantie:

nosdrinker:

advils:

Looking in my parents closet I’m going to throw up

this is hell

Whaaaat, parents have a sexual life? NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooooo
…
seriously, grow up please.

if accepting the fact that my mom uses nipple tassels is part of growing up then i don’t want to grow up

what if it’s not your mom who uses them

It’s super gross, that candy could be expired and give her parents food poisoning. Best head back to the sex shop for a fresh pair. View Larger

tf2crazy:

advils:

plantie:

nosdrinker:

advils:

Looking in my parents closet I’m going to throw up

this is hell

Whaaaat, parents have a sexual life? NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooooo

seriously, grow up please.

if accepting the fact that my mom uses nipple tassels is part of growing up then i don’t want to grow up

what if it’s not your mom who uses them

It’s super gross, that candy could be expired and give her parents food poisoning. Best head back to the sex shop for a fresh pair.

(Source: ancestor)


notamorningbird:

lillian-raven:

hungrylikethewolfie:

cure-krismoth:

pagangirl:

emegustart:

latining:

emegustart:

chenisthebestkitty:

emegustart:

This is supposed to happen the first time Persephone is back to the Underworld….so I went and made a sequel for a comic that hasn’t even happened yet. Wibbly wobbly timey wimey….
Did I regret anything? No. No I don’t. 
on deviantart

._.
He kidnapped her
Against her will
Thanks fo her father after her father raped her
She starved herself to get out of his place
twhere do people read romance into this, where??ßß1ßewkofp *flops over*

Thanks for continue to focus on the kidnapping part which is not the point of this myth. 
Life and Death, the balance between them and the changes they cause, and the origin and meaning of the seasons cycle, on the other hand, are the real points. 
Thanks for also persisting in the idea of Persephone as a passive figure. Kidnapped, raped, silenced, with no saying or power over anything (except for maybe starved herself because there are so many different versions of this myth that it’s difficult to keep track of them, did you know that apparently there is a version where she and Hades plot together?)
Thanks for also forgetting that she’s a goddess on her own and becomes Queen and Hades’ equal and actually they’re most stable marriages in the myths. 
Thank you, you’ve enriched this post by telling me things I already know but I don’t care about. (◡‿◡✿)

Reblogging for the bitchin’ commentary and also to add that if anyone wants to read the most current (and IMO accurate) studies on Greek mythology and women’s lives, Women in Greek Myth by Dr. Mary Lefkowitz is invaluable (and incredibly inexpensive for an academic book).
The confusion comes from “Zeus” which is almost a title for a supreme god (think of the way “Caesar” was used). So you have Heavenly Zeus and Infernal Zeus, and they are not the same god but rather the supreme ruler of the sky and underworld, respectively. Likewise Persephone became known as “Infernal Hera” and this naming scheme persisted well into the Roman Empire, where Pluto and Proserpina are referred to as “Infernal Juno” and “Jupiter of Dis” in Book 6 of the Aeneid as well as on many grave monuments and in spells.
Moreover, gods don’t need to eat. Persephone refusing to eat was her refusing to become a part of the Underworld, not her attempting to starve herself. The gods are defined as being deathless, and in Ancient Greek “deathless” is synonymous with “god”. (Cf. Theogony, Works and Days, any of the Homeric Hymns, etc.) The Homeric Hymn to Demeter is really clear about this. (HH 2 370-4, 393-403.)
The marriage of Persephone and Hades is actually the most loving and consensual union among the Olympian deities. Hades first offers a dowry designed specifically to please Persephone (HH 2 10-14.), then carries her off and keeps her as a guest of honour in his house. (HH 2 341-345) Persephone is referred to as αἰδοίῃ παρακοίτι - his reverent wife. “Reverent” here refers to a respect for one’s duty, and the similarity between the pronunciation of αἰδοῖος an “Hades” is deliberate and intended to show how well-matched they are. Persephone misses her mother, yes, but is not overly upset about her marriage to Hades. Even Anchises expresses more regret over his union with Aphrodite. (HH 5 185-190.) Finally, as a proper parent, Demeter is rewarded for giving up her daughter, and offers a gift to the other gods in turn. (HH 2 441-495.)
It is worth noting that Demeter is given a position of remarkable power in this myth and is in many ways treated as or better than a father would be. The focus of the hymn remains the relationship between mother and daughter, and emphasises that it is a bond that can endure even after a woman leaves to marry. More importantly, the Homeric Hymn to Demeter is an etiological myth for the Thesmophoria and the Eleusinian Mysteries, a woman-only festival and the most enduring mystery cult of the ancient world. HH 2 serves to anchor women firmly in religious and family life and sets some fairly idealised standards for husbands. Many issues arise when attempting to interpret this myth into a modern context, which is why it is so important to understand that the myth was created over three thousand years ago and is largely a historical document reflecting the mores of the time.

This is the last time I’m reblogging this strip. I edited the original post because I’m really tired of this discussion, but latining’s comment is just perfect and flawless and really educating and everyone interested in this myth should read it. 

THIS IS FUCKING BEAUTIFUL AND IM SO GLAD THAT MY BOYFRIEND REBLOGGED IT FOR ME TO SEE AND TO READ THE COMMENTS OMFG

Also like to point out that Hades and Persephone were one of, if not the, most faithful divine couples in Greek mythology. 
Compare that to Zeus, who slept with anything that moved.

This comic is beautiful and adorable, and the commentary is (if you’ll pardon the pun) divine.  A++, FAVORITE MYTHOLOGICAL COUPLE, WOULD FALL IN LOVE WITH THEM AGAIN.

#seriously people please stop trying to paint her as too dim to remember that eating would keep her there #she was a freaking GODDESS SHE KNEW THE RULES #also who the fuck eats SIX pomegranate seeds unless it’s to make a point? #no one that’s who #[/rant]

Beautiful commentary. God, I love mythology. 

This is super interesting and I have a mighty need to read more mythology. notamorningbird:

lillian-raven:

hungrylikethewolfie:

cure-krismoth:

pagangirl:

emegustart:

latining:

emegustart:

chenisthebestkitty:

emegustart:

This is supposed to happen the first time Persephone is back to the Underworld….so I went and made a sequel for a comic that hasn’t even happened yet. Wibbly wobbly timey wimey….
Did I regret anything? No. No I don’t. 
on deviantart

._.
He kidnapped her
Against her will
Thanks fo her father after her father raped her
She starved herself to get out of his place
twhere do people read romance into this, where??ßß1ßewkofp *flops over*

Thanks for continue to focus on the kidnapping part which is not the point of this myth. 
Life and Death, the balance between them and the changes they cause, and the origin and meaning of the seasons cycle, on the other hand, are the real points. 
Thanks for also persisting in the idea of Persephone as a passive figure. Kidnapped, raped, silenced, with no saying or power over anything (except for maybe starved herself because there are so many different versions of this myth that it’s difficult to keep track of them, did you know that apparently there is a version where she and Hades plot together?)
Thanks for also forgetting that she’s a goddess on her own and becomes Queen and Hades’ equal and actually they’re most stable marriages in the myths. 
Thank you, you’ve enriched this post by telling me things I already know but I don’t care about. (◡‿◡✿)

Reblogging for the bitchin’ commentary and also to add that if anyone wants to read the most current (and IMO accurate) studies on Greek mythology and women’s lives, Women in Greek Myth by Dr. Mary Lefkowitz is invaluable (and incredibly inexpensive for an academic book).
The confusion comes from “Zeus” which is almost a title for a supreme god (think of the way “Caesar” was used). So you have Heavenly Zeus and Infernal Zeus, and they are not the same god but rather the supreme ruler of the sky and underworld, respectively. Likewise Persephone became known as “Infernal Hera” and this naming scheme persisted well into the Roman Empire, where Pluto and Proserpina are referred to as “Infernal Juno” and “Jupiter of Dis” in Book 6 of the Aeneid as well as on many grave monuments and in spells.
Moreover, gods don’t need to eat. Persephone refusing to eat was her refusing to become a part of the Underworld, not her attempting to starve herself. The gods are defined as being deathless, and in Ancient Greek “deathless” is synonymous with “god”. (Cf. Theogony, Works and Days, any of the Homeric Hymns, etc.) The Homeric Hymn to Demeter is really clear about this. (HH 2 370-4, 393-403.)
The marriage of Persephone and Hades is actually the most loving and consensual union among the Olympian deities. Hades first offers a dowry designed specifically to please Persephone (HH 2 10-14.), then carries her off and keeps her as a guest of honour in his house. (HH 2 341-345) Persephone is referred to as αἰδοίῃ παρακοίτι - his reverent wife. “Reverent” here refers to a respect for one’s duty, and the similarity between the pronunciation of αἰδοῖος an “Hades” is deliberate and intended to show how well-matched they are. Persephone misses her mother, yes, but is not overly upset about her marriage to Hades. Even Anchises expresses more regret over his union with Aphrodite. (HH 5 185-190.) Finally, as a proper parent, Demeter is rewarded for giving up her daughter, and offers a gift to the other gods in turn. (HH 2 441-495.)
It is worth noting that Demeter is given a position of remarkable power in this myth and is in many ways treated as or better than a father would be. The focus of the hymn remains the relationship between mother and daughter, and emphasises that it is a bond that can endure even after a woman leaves to marry. More importantly, the Homeric Hymn to Demeter is an etiological myth for the Thesmophoria and the Eleusinian Mysteries, a woman-only festival and the most enduring mystery cult of the ancient world. HH 2 serves to anchor women firmly in religious and family life and sets some fairly idealised standards for husbands. Many issues arise when attempting to interpret this myth into a modern context, which is why it is so important to understand that the myth was created over three thousand years ago and is largely a historical document reflecting the mores of the time.

This is the last time I’m reblogging this strip. I edited the original post because I’m really tired of this discussion, but latining’s comment is just perfect and flawless and really educating and everyone interested in this myth should read it. 

THIS IS FUCKING BEAUTIFUL AND IM SO GLAD THAT MY BOYFRIEND REBLOGGED IT FOR ME TO SEE AND TO READ THE COMMENTS OMFG

Also like to point out that Hades and Persephone were one of, if not the, most faithful divine couples in Greek mythology. 
Compare that to Zeus, who slept with anything that moved.

This comic is beautiful and adorable, and the commentary is (if you’ll pardon the pun) divine.  A++, FAVORITE MYTHOLOGICAL COUPLE, WOULD FALL IN LOVE WITH THEM AGAIN.

#seriously people please stop trying to paint her as too dim to remember that eating would keep her there #she was a freaking GODDESS SHE KNEW THE RULES #also who the fuck eats SIX pomegranate seeds unless it’s to make a point? #no one that’s who #[/rant]

Beautiful commentary. God, I love mythology. 

This is super interesting and I have a mighty need to read more mythology. notamorningbird:

lillian-raven:

hungrylikethewolfie:

cure-krismoth:

pagangirl:

emegustart:

latining:

emegustart:

chenisthebestkitty:

emegustart:

This is supposed to happen the first time Persephone is back to the Underworld….so I went and made a sequel for a comic that hasn’t even happened yet. Wibbly wobbly timey wimey….
Did I regret anything? No. No I don’t. 
on deviantart

._.
He kidnapped her
Against her will
Thanks fo her father after her father raped her
She starved herself to get out of his place
twhere do people read romance into this, where??ßß1ßewkofp *flops over*

Thanks for continue to focus on the kidnapping part which is not the point of this myth. 
Life and Death, the balance between them and the changes they cause, and the origin and meaning of the seasons cycle, on the other hand, are the real points. 
Thanks for also persisting in the idea of Persephone as a passive figure. Kidnapped, raped, silenced, with no saying or power over anything (except for maybe starved herself because there are so many different versions of this myth that it’s difficult to keep track of them, did you know that apparently there is a version where she and Hades plot together?)
Thanks for also forgetting that she’s a goddess on her own and becomes Queen and Hades’ equal and actually they’re most stable marriages in the myths. 
Thank you, you’ve enriched this post by telling me things I already know but I don’t care about. (◡‿◡✿)

Reblogging for the bitchin’ commentary and also to add that if anyone wants to read the most current (and IMO accurate) studies on Greek mythology and women’s lives, Women in Greek Myth by Dr. Mary Lefkowitz is invaluable (and incredibly inexpensive for an academic book).
The confusion comes from “Zeus” which is almost a title for a supreme god (think of the way “Caesar” was used). So you have Heavenly Zeus and Infernal Zeus, and they are not the same god but rather the supreme ruler of the sky and underworld, respectively. Likewise Persephone became known as “Infernal Hera” and this naming scheme persisted well into the Roman Empire, where Pluto and Proserpina are referred to as “Infernal Juno” and “Jupiter of Dis” in Book 6 of the Aeneid as well as on many grave monuments and in spells.
Moreover, gods don’t need to eat. Persephone refusing to eat was her refusing to become a part of the Underworld, not her attempting to starve herself. The gods are defined as being deathless, and in Ancient Greek “deathless” is synonymous with “god”. (Cf. Theogony, Works and Days, any of the Homeric Hymns, etc.) The Homeric Hymn to Demeter is really clear about this. (HH 2 370-4, 393-403.)
The marriage of Persephone and Hades is actually the most loving and consensual union among the Olympian deities. Hades first offers a dowry designed specifically to please Persephone (HH 2 10-14.), then carries her off and keeps her as a guest of honour in his house. (HH 2 341-345) Persephone is referred to as αἰδοίῃ παρακοίτι - his reverent wife. “Reverent” here refers to a respect for one’s duty, and the similarity between the pronunciation of αἰδοῖος an “Hades” is deliberate and intended to show how well-matched they are. Persephone misses her mother, yes, but is not overly upset about her marriage to Hades. Even Anchises expresses more regret over his union with Aphrodite. (HH 5 185-190.) Finally, as a proper parent, Demeter is rewarded for giving up her daughter, and offers a gift to the other gods in turn. (HH 2 441-495.)
It is worth noting that Demeter is given a position of remarkable power in this myth and is in many ways treated as or better than a father would be. The focus of the hymn remains the relationship between mother and daughter, and emphasises that it is a bond that can endure even after a woman leaves to marry. More importantly, the Homeric Hymn to Demeter is an etiological myth for the Thesmophoria and the Eleusinian Mysteries, a woman-only festival and the most enduring mystery cult of the ancient world. HH 2 serves to anchor women firmly in religious and family life and sets some fairly idealised standards for husbands. Many issues arise when attempting to interpret this myth into a modern context, which is why it is so important to understand that the myth was created over three thousand years ago and is largely a historical document reflecting the mores of the time.

This is the last time I’m reblogging this strip. I edited the original post because I’m really tired of this discussion, but latining’s comment is just perfect and flawless and really educating and everyone interested in this myth should read it. 

THIS IS FUCKING BEAUTIFUL AND IM SO GLAD THAT MY BOYFRIEND REBLOGGED IT FOR ME TO SEE AND TO READ THE COMMENTS OMFG

Also like to point out that Hades and Persephone were one of, if not the, most faithful divine couples in Greek mythology. 
Compare that to Zeus, who slept with anything that moved.

This comic is beautiful and adorable, and the commentary is (if you’ll pardon the pun) divine.  A++, FAVORITE MYTHOLOGICAL COUPLE, WOULD FALL IN LOVE WITH THEM AGAIN.

#seriously people please stop trying to paint her as too dim to remember that eating would keep her there #she was a freaking GODDESS SHE KNEW THE RULES #also who the fuck eats SIX pomegranate seeds unless it’s to make a point? #no one that’s who #[/rant]

Beautiful commentary. God, I love mythology. 

This is super interesting and I have a mighty need to read more mythology. notamorningbird:

lillian-raven:

hungrylikethewolfie:

cure-krismoth:

pagangirl:

emegustart:

latining:

emegustart:

chenisthebestkitty:

emegustart:

This is supposed to happen the first time Persephone is back to the Underworld….so I went and made a sequel for a comic that hasn’t even happened yet. Wibbly wobbly timey wimey….
Did I regret anything? No. No I don’t. 
on deviantart

._.
He kidnapped her
Against her will
Thanks fo her father after her father raped her
She starved herself to get out of his place
twhere do people read romance into this, where??ßß1ßewkofp *flops over*

Thanks for continue to focus on the kidnapping part which is not the point of this myth. 
Life and Death, the balance between them and the changes they cause, and the origin and meaning of the seasons cycle, on the other hand, are the real points. 
Thanks for also persisting in the idea of Persephone as a passive figure. Kidnapped, raped, silenced, with no saying or power over anything (except for maybe starved herself because there are so many different versions of this myth that it’s difficult to keep track of them, did you know that apparently there is a version where she and Hades plot together?)
Thanks for also forgetting that she’s a goddess on her own and becomes Queen and Hades’ equal and actually they’re most stable marriages in the myths. 
Thank you, you’ve enriched this post by telling me things I already know but I don’t care about. (◡‿◡✿)

Reblogging for the bitchin’ commentary and also to add that if anyone wants to read the most current (and IMO accurate) studies on Greek mythology and women’s lives, Women in Greek Myth by Dr. Mary Lefkowitz is invaluable (and incredibly inexpensive for an academic book).
The confusion comes from “Zeus” which is almost a title for a supreme god (think of the way “Caesar” was used). So you have Heavenly Zeus and Infernal Zeus, and they are not the same god but rather the supreme ruler of the sky and underworld, respectively. Likewise Persephone became known as “Infernal Hera” and this naming scheme persisted well into the Roman Empire, where Pluto and Proserpina are referred to as “Infernal Juno” and “Jupiter of Dis” in Book 6 of the Aeneid as well as on many grave monuments and in spells.
Moreover, gods don’t need to eat. Persephone refusing to eat was her refusing to become a part of the Underworld, not her attempting to starve herself. The gods are defined as being deathless, and in Ancient Greek “deathless” is synonymous with “god”. (Cf. Theogony, Works and Days, any of the Homeric Hymns, etc.) The Homeric Hymn to Demeter is really clear about this. (HH 2 370-4, 393-403.)
The marriage of Persephone and Hades is actually the most loving and consensual union among the Olympian deities. Hades first offers a dowry designed specifically to please Persephone (HH 2 10-14.), then carries her off and keeps her as a guest of honour in his house. (HH 2 341-345) Persephone is referred to as αἰδοίῃ παρακοίτι - his reverent wife. “Reverent” here refers to a respect for one’s duty, and the similarity between the pronunciation of αἰδοῖος an “Hades” is deliberate and intended to show how well-matched they are. Persephone misses her mother, yes, but is not overly upset about her marriage to Hades. Even Anchises expresses more regret over his union with Aphrodite. (HH 5 185-190.) Finally, as a proper parent, Demeter is rewarded for giving up her daughter, and offers a gift to the other gods in turn. (HH 2 441-495.)
It is worth noting that Demeter is given a position of remarkable power in this myth and is in many ways treated as or better than a father would be. The focus of the hymn remains the relationship between mother and daughter, and emphasises that it is a bond that can endure even after a woman leaves to marry. More importantly, the Homeric Hymn to Demeter is an etiological myth for the Thesmophoria and the Eleusinian Mysteries, a woman-only festival and the most enduring mystery cult of the ancient world. HH 2 serves to anchor women firmly in religious and family life and sets some fairly idealised standards for husbands. Many issues arise when attempting to interpret this myth into a modern context, which is why it is so important to understand that the myth was created over three thousand years ago and is largely a historical document reflecting the mores of the time.

This is the last time I’m reblogging this strip. I edited the original post because I’m really tired of this discussion, but latining’s comment is just perfect and flawless and really educating and everyone interested in this myth should read it. 

THIS IS FUCKING BEAUTIFUL AND IM SO GLAD THAT MY BOYFRIEND REBLOGGED IT FOR ME TO SEE AND TO READ THE COMMENTS OMFG

Also like to point out that Hades and Persephone were one of, if not the, most faithful divine couples in Greek mythology. 
Compare that to Zeus, who slept with anything that moved.

This comic is beautiful and adorable, and the commentary is (if you’ll pardon the pun) divine.  A++, FAVORITE MYTHOLOGICAL COUPLE, WOULD FALL IN LOVE WITH THEM AGAIN.

#seriously people please stop trying to paint her as too dim to remember that eating would keep her there #she was a freaking GODDESS SHE KNEW THE RULES #also who the fuck eats SIX pomegranate seeds unless it’s to make a point? #no one that’s who #[/rant]

Beautiful commentary. God, I love mythology. 

This is super interesting and I have a mighty need to read more mythology. notamorningbird:

lillian-raven:

hungrylikethewolfie:

cure-krismoth:

pagangirl:

emegustart:

latining:

emegustart:

chenisthebestkitty:

emegustart:

This is supposed to happen the first time Persephone is back to the Underworld….so I went and made a sequel for a comic that hasn’t even happened yet. Wibbly wobbly timey wimey….
Did I regret anything? No. No I don’t. 
on deviantart

._.
He kidnapped her
Against her will
Thanks fo her father after her father raped her
She starved herself to get out of his place
twhere do people read romance into this, where??ßß1ßewkofp *flops over*

Thanks for continue to focus on the kidnapping part which is not the point of this myth. 
Life and Death, the balance between them and the changes they cause, and the origin and meaning of the seasons cycle, on the other hand, are the real points. 
Thanks for also persisting in the idea of Persephone as a passive figure. Kidnapped, raped, silenced, with no saying or power over anything (except for maybe starved herself because there are so many different versions of this myth that it’s difficult to keep track of them, did you know that apparently there is a version where she and Hades plot together?)
Thanks for also forgetting that she’s a goddess on her own and becomes Queen and Hades’ equal and actually they’re most stable marriages in the myths. 
Thank you, you’ve enriched this post by telling me things I already know but I don’t care about. (◡‿◡✿)

Reblogging for the bitchin’ commentary and also to add that if anyone wants to read the most current (and IMO accurate) studies on Greek mythology and women’s lives, Women in Greek Myth by Dr. Mary Lefkowitz is invaluable (and incredibly inexpensive for an academic book).
The confusion comes from “Zeus” which is almost a title for a supreme god (think of the way “Caesar” was used). So you have Heavenly Zeus and Infernal Zeus, and they are not the same god but rather the supreme ruler of the sky and underworld, respectively. Likewise Persephone became known as “Infernal Hera” and this naming scheme persisted well into the Roman Empire, where Pluto and Proserpina are referred to as “Infernal Juno” and “Jupiter of Dis” in Book 6 of the Aeneid as well as on many grave monuments and in spells.
Moreover, gods don’t need to eat. Persephone refusing to eat was her refusing to become a part of the Underworld, not her attempting to starve herself. The gods are defined as being deathless, and in Ancient Greek “deathless” is synonymous with “god”. (Cf. Theogony, Works and Days, any of the Homeric Hymns, etc.) The Homeric Hymn to Demeter is really clear about this. (HH 2 370-4, 393-403.)
The marriage of Persephone and Hades is actually the most loving and consensual union among the Olympian deities. Hades first offers a dowry designed specifically to please Persephone (HH 2 10-14.), then carries her off and keeps her as a guest of honour in his house. (HH 2 341-345) Persephone is referred to as αἰδοίῃ παρακοίτι - his reverent wife. “Reverent” here refers to a respect for one’s duty, and the similarity between the pronunciation of αἰδοῖος an “Hades” is deliberate and intended to show how well-matched they are. Persephone misses her mother, yes, but is not overly upset about her marriage to Hades. Even Anchises expresses more regret over his union with Aphrodite. (HH 5 185-190.) Finally, as a proper parent, Demeter is rewarded for giving up her daughter, and offers a gift to the other gods in turn. (HH 2 441-495.)
It is worth noting that Demeter is given a position of remarkable power in this myth and is in many ways treated as or better than a father would be. The focus of the hymn remains the relationship between mother and daughter, and emphasises that it is a bond that can endure even after a woman leaves to marry. More importantly, the Homeric Hymn to Demeter is an etiological myth for the Thesmophoria and the Eleusinian Mysteries, a woman-only festival and the most enduring mystery cult of the ancient world. HH 2 serves to anchor women firmly in religious and family life and sets some fairly idealised standards for husbands. Many issues arise when attempting to interpret this myth into a modern context, which is why it is so important to understand that the myth was created over three thousand years ago and is largely a historical document reflecting the mores of the time.

This is the last time I’m reblogging this strip. I edited the original post because I’m really tired of this discussion, but latining’s comment is just perfect and flawless and really educating and everyone interested in this myth should read it. 

THIS IS FUCKING BEAUTIFUL AND IM SO GLAD THAT MY BOYFRIEND REBLOGGED IT FOR ME TO SEE AND TO READ THE COMMENTS OMFG

Also like to point out that Hades and Persephone were one of, if not the, most faithful divine couples in Greek mythology. 
Compare that to Zeus, who slept with anything that moved.

This comic is beautiful and adorable, and the commentary is (if you’ll pardon the pun) divine.  A++, FAVORITE MYTHOLOGICAL COUPLE, WOULD FALL IN LOVE WITH THEM AGAIN.

#seriously people please stop trying to paint her as too dim to remember that eating would keep her there #she was a freaking GODDESS SHE KNEW THE RULES #also who the fuck eats SIX pomegranate seeds unless it’s to make a point? #no one that’s who #[/rant]

Beautiful commentary. God, I love mythology. 

This is super interesting and I have a mighty need to read more mythology. notamorningbird:

lillian-raven:

hungrylikethewolfie:

cure-krismoth:

pagangirl:

emegustart:

latining:

emegustart:

chenisthebestkitty:

emegustart:

This is supposed to happen the first time Persephone is back to the Underworld….so I went and made a sequel for a comic that hasn’t even happened yet. Wibbly wobbly timey wimey….
Did I regret anything? No. No I don’t. 
on deviantart

._.
He kidnapped her
Against her will
Thanks fo her father after her father raped her
She starved herself to get out of his place
twhere do people read romance into this, where??ßß1ßewkofp *flops over*

Thanks for continue to focus on the kidnapping part which is not the point of this myth. 
Life and Death, the balance between them and the changes they cause, and the origin and meaning of the seasons cycle, on the other hand, are the real points. 
Thanks for also persisting in the idea of Persephone as a passive figure. Kidnapped, raped, silenced, with no saying or power over anything (except for maybe starved herself because there are so many different versions of this myth that it’s difficult to keep track of them, did you know that apparently there is a version where she and Hades plot together?)
Thanks for also forgetting that she’s a goddess on her own and becomes Queen and Hades’ equal and actually they’re most stable marriages in the myths. 
Thank you, you’ve enriched this post by telling me things I already know but I don’t care about. (◡‿◡✿)

Reblogging for the bitchin’ commentary and also to add that if anyone wants to read the most current (and IMO accurate) studies on Greek mythology and women’s lives, Women in Greek Myth by Dr. Mary Lefkowitz is invaluable (and incredibly inexpensive for an academic book).
The confusion comes from “Zeus” which is almost a title for a supreme god (think of the way “Caesar” was used). So you have Heavenly Zeus and Infernal Zeus, and they are not the same god but rather the supreme ruler of the sky and underworld, respectively. Likewise Persephone became known as “Infernal Hera” and this naming scheme persisted well into the Roman Empire, where Pluto and Proserpina are referred to as “Infernal Juno” and “Jupiter of Dis” in Book 6 of the Aeneid as well as on many grave monuments and in spells.
Moreover, gods don’t need to eat. Persephone refusing to eat was her refusing to become a part of the Underworld, not her attempting to starve herself. The gods are defined as being deathless, and in Ancient Greek “deathless” is synonymous with “god”. (Cf. Theogony, Works and Days, any of the Homeric Hymns, etc.) The Homeric Hymn to Demeter is really clear about this. (HH 2 370-4, 393-403.)
The marriage of Persephone and Hades is actually the most loving and consensual union among the Olympian deities. Hades first offers a dowry designed specifically to please Persephone (HH 2 10-14.), then carries her off and keeps her as a guest of honour in his house. (HH 2 341-345) Persephone is referred to as αἰδοίῃ παρακοίτι - his reverent wife. “Reverent” here refers to a respect for one’s duty, and the similarity between the pronunciation of αἰδοῖος an “Hades” is deliberate and intended to show how well-matched they are. Persephone misses her mother, yes, but is not overly upset about her marriage to Hades. Even Anchises expresses more regret over his union with Aphrodite. (HH 5 185-190.) Finally, as a proper parent, Demeter is rewarded for giving up her daughter, and offers a gift to the other gods in turn. (HH 2 441-495.)
It is worth noting that Demeter is given a position of remarkable power in this myth and is in many ways treated as or better than a father would be. The focus of the hymn remains the relationship between mother and daughter, and emphasises that it is a bond that can endure even after a woman leaves to marry. More importantly, the Homeric Hymn to Demeter is an etiological myth for the Thesmophoria and the Eleusinian Mysteries, a woman-only festival and the most enduring mystery cult of the ancient world. HH 2 serves to anchor women firmly in religious and family life and sets some fairly idealised standards for husbands. Many issues arise when attempting to interpret this myth into a modern context, which is why it is so important to understand that the myth was created over three thousand years ago and is largely a historical document reflecting the mores of the time.

This is the last time I’m reblogging this strip. I edited the original post because I’m really tired of this discussion, but latining’s comment is just perfect and flawless and really educating and everyone interested in this myth should read it. 

THIS IS FUCKING BEAUTIFUL AND IM SO GLAD THAT MY BOYFRIEND REBLOGGED IT FOR ME TO SEE AND TO READ THE COMMENTS OMFG

Also like to point out that Hades and Persephone were one of, if not the, most faithful divine couples in Greek mythology. 
Compare that to Zeus, who slept with anything that moved.

This comic is beautiful and adorable, and the commentary is (if you’ll pardon the pun) divine.  A++, FAVORITE MYTHOLOGICAL COUPLE, WOULD FALL IN LOVE WITH THEM AGAIN.

#seriously people please stop trying to paint her as too dim to remember that eating would keep her there #she was a freaking GODDESS SHE KNEW THE RULES #also who the fuck eats SIX pomegranate seeds unless it’s to make a point? #no one that’s who #[/rant]

Beautiful commentary. God, I love mythology. 

This is super interesting and I have a mighty need to read more mythology. notamorningbird:

lillian-raven:

hungrylikethewolfie:

cure-krismoth:

pagangirl:

emegustart:

latining:

emegustart:

chenisthebestkitty:

emegustart:

This is supposed to happen the first time Persephone is back to the Underworld….so I went and made a sequel for a comic that hasn’t even happened yet. Wibbly wobbly timey wimey….
Did I regret anything? No. No I don’t. 
on deviantart

._.
He kidnapped her
Against her will
Thanks fo her father after her father raped her
She starved herself to get out of his place
twhere do people read romance into this, where??ßß1ßewkofp *flops over*

Thanks for continue to focus on the kidnapping part which is not the point of this myth. 
Life and Death, the balance between them and the changes they cause, and the origin and meaning of the seasons cycle, on the other hand, are the real points. 
Thanks for also persisting in the idea of Persephone as a passive figure. Kidnapped, raped, silenced, with no saying or power over anything (except for maybe starved herself because there are so many different versions of this myth that it’s difficult to keep track of them, did you know that apparently there is a version where she and Hades plot together?)
Thanks for also forgetting that she’s a goddess on her own and becomes Queen and Hades’ equal and actually they’re most stable marriages in the myths. 
Thank you, you’ve enriched this post by telling me things I already know but I don’t care about. (◡‿◡✿)

Reblogging for the bitchin’ commentary and also to add that if anyone wants to read the most current (and IMO accurate) studies on Greek mythology and women’s lives, Women in Greek Myth by Dr. Mary Lefkowitz is invaluable (and incredibly inexpensive for an academic book).
The confusion comes from “Zeus” which is almost a title for a supreme god (think of the way “Caesar” was used). So you have Heavenly Zeus and Infernal Zeus, and they are not the same god but rather the supreme ruler of the sky and underworld, respectively. Likewise Persephone became known as “Infernal Hera” and this naming scheme persisted well into the Roman Empire, where Pluto and Proserpina are referred to as “Infernal Juno” and “Jupiter of Dis” in Book 6 of the Aeneid as well as on many grave monuments and in spells.
Moreover, gods don’t need to eat. Persephone refusing to eat was her refusing to become a part of the Underworld, not her attempting to starve herself. The gods are defined as being deathless, and in Ancient Greek “deathless” is synonymous with “god”. (Cf. Theogony, Works and Days, any of the Homeric Hymns, etc.) The Homeric Hymn to Demeter is really clear about this. (HH 2 370-4, 393-403.)
The marriage of Persephone and Hades is actually the most loving and consensual union among the Olympian deities. Hades first offers a dowry designed specifically to please Persephone (HH 2 10-14.), then carries her off and keeps her as a guest of honour in his house. (HH 2 341-345) Persephone is referred to as αἰδοίῃ παρακοίτι - his reverent wife. “Reverent” here refers to a respect for one’s duty, and the similarity between the pronunciation of αἰδοῖος an “Hades” is deliberate and intended to show how well-matched they are. Persephone misses her mother, yes, but is not overly upset about her marriage to Hades. Even Anchises expresses more regret over his union with Aphrodite. (HH 5 185-190.) Finally, as a proper parent, Demeter is rewarded for giving up her daughter, and offers a gift to the other gods in turn. (HH 2 441-495.)
It is worth noting that Demeter is given a position of remarkable power in this myth and is in many ways treated as or better than a father would be. The focus of the hymn remains the relationship between mother and daughter, and emphasises that it is a bond that can endure even after a woman leaves to marry. More importantly, the Homeric Hymn to Demeter is an etiological myth for the Thesmophoria and the Eleusinian Mysteries, a woman-only festival and the most enduring mystery cult of the ancient world. HH 2 serves to anchor women firmly in religious and family life and sets some fairly idealised standards for husbands. Many issues arise when attempting to interpret this myth into a modern context, which is why it is so important to understand that the myth was created over three thousand years ago and is largely a historical document reflecting the mores of the time.

This is the last time I’m reblogging this strip. I edited the original post because I’m really tired of this discussion, but latining’s comment is just perfect and flawless and really educating and everyone interested in this myth should read it. 

THIS IS FUCKING BEAUTIFUL AND IM SO GLAD THAT MY BOYFRIEND REBLOGGED IT FOR ME TO SEE AND TO READ THE COMMENTS OMFG

Also like to point out that Hades and Persephone were one of, if not the, most faithful divine couples in Greek mythology. 
Compare that to Zeus, who slept with anything that moved.

This comic is beautiful and adorable, and the commentary is (if you’ll pardon the pun) divine.  A++, FAVORITE MYTHOLOGICAL COUPLE, WOULD FALL IN LOVE WITH THEM AGAIN.

#seriously people please stop trying to paint her as too dim to remember that eating would keep her there #she was a freaking GODDESS SHE KNEW THE RULES #also who the fuck eats SIX pomegranate seeds unless it’s to make a point? #no one that’s who #[/rant]

Beautiful commentary. God, I love mythology. 

This is super interesting and I have a mighty need to read more mythology. 

notamorningbird:

lillian-raven:

hungrylikethewolfie:

cure-krismoth:

pagangirl:

emegustart:

latining:

emegustart:

chenisthebestkitty:

emegustart:

This is supposed to happen the first time Persephone is back to the Underworld….so I went and made a sequel for a comic that hasn’t even happened yet. Wibbly wobbly timey wimey….

Did I regret anything? No. No I don’t. 

on deviantart

._.

He kidnapped her

Against her will

Thanks fo her father after her father raped her

She starved herself to get out of his place

twhere do people read romance into this, where??ßß1ßewkofp *flops over*

Thanks for continue to focus on the kidnapping part which is not the point of this myth. 

Life and Death, the balance between them and the changes they cause, and the origin and meaning of the seasons cycle, on the other hand, are the real points. 

Thanks for also persisting in the idea of Persephone as a passive figure. Kidnapped, raped, silenced, with no saying or power over anything (except for maybe starved herself because there are so many different versions of this myth that it’s difficult to keep track of them, did you know that apparently there is a version where she and Hades plot together?)

Thanks for also forgetting that she’s a goddess on her own and becomes Queen and Hades’ equal and actually they’re most stable marriages in the myths. 

Thank you, you’ve enriched this post by telling me things I already know but I don’t care about. (◡‿◡✿)

Reblogging for the bitchin’ commentary and also to add that if anyone wants to read the most current (and IMO accurate) studies on Greek mythology and women’s lives, Women in Greek Myth by Dr. Mary Lefkowitz is invaluable (and incredibly inexpensive for an academic book).

The confusion comes from “Zeus” which is almost a title for a supreme god (think of the way “Caesar” was used). So you have Heavenly Zeus and Infernal Zeus, and they are not the same god but rather the supreme ruler of the sky and underworld, respectively. Likewise Persephone became known as “Infernal Hera” and this naming scheme persisted well into the Roman Empire, where Pluto and Proserpina are referred to as “Infernal Juno” and “Jupiter of Dis” in Book 6 of the Aeneid as well as on many grave monuments and in spells.

Moreover, gods don’t need to eat. Persephone refusing to eat was her refusing to become a part of the Underworld, not her attempting to starve herself. The gods are defined as being deathless, and in Ancient Greek “deathless” is synonymous with “god”. (Cf. Theogony, Works and Days, any of the Homeric Hymns, etc.) The Homeric Hymn to Demeter is really clear about this. (HH 2 370-4, 393-403.)

The marriage of Persephone and Hades is actually the most loving and consensual union among the Olympian deities. Hades first offers a dowry designed specifically to please Persephone (HH 2 10-14.), then carries her off and keeps her as a guest of honour in his house. (HH 2 341-345) Persephone is referred to as αἰδοίῃ παρακοίτι - his reverent wife. “Reverent” here refers to a respect for one’s duty, and the similarity between the pronunciation of αἰδοῖος an “Hades” is deliberate and intended to show how well-matched they are. Persephone misses her mother, yes, but is not overly upset about her marriage to Hades. Even Anchises expresses more regret over his union with Aphrodite. (HH 5 185-190.) Finally, as a proper parent, Demeter is rewarded for giving up her daughter, and offers a gift to the other gods in turn. (HH 2 441-495.)

It is worth noting that Demeter is given a position of remarkable power in this myth and is in many ways treated as or better than a father would be. The focus of the hymn remains the relationship between mother and daughter, and emphasises that it is a bond that can endure even after a woman leaves to marry. More importantly, the Homeric Hymn to Demeter is an etiological myth for the Thesmophoria and the Eleusinian Mysteries, a woman-only festival and the most enduring mystery cult of the ancient world. HH 2 serves to anchor women firmly in religious and family life and sets some fairly idealised standards for husbands. Many issues arise when attempting to interpret this myth into a modern context, which is why it is so important to understand that the myth was created over three thousand years ago and is largely a historical document reflecting the mores of the time.

This is the last time I’m reblogging this strip. I edited the original post because I’m really tired of this discussion, but latining’s comment is just perfect and flawless and really educating and everyone interested in this myth should read it. 

THIS IS FUCKING BEAUTIFUL AND IM SO GLAD THAT MY BOYFRIEND REBLOGGED IT FOR ME TO SEE AND TO READ THE COMMENTS OMFG

Also like to point out that Hades and Persephone were one of, if not the, most faithful divine couples in Greek mythology. 

Compare that to Zeus, who slept with anything that moved.

This comic is beautiful and adorable, and the commentary is (if you’ll pardon the pun) divine.  A++, FAVORITE MYTHOLOGICAL COUPLE, WOULD FALL IN LOVE WITH THEM AGAIN.

Beautiful commentary. God, I love mythology. 

This is super interesting and I have a mighty need to read more mythology. 


phlurp:

My friend claimed he could play Flight of the Bumblebee and accompany himself. Then he did this.


lohanthony:

WHO THE FUCK IS THIS GIRL

(Source: fuks)